University of Massachusetts Amherst

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Mechanical engineering major Moijue Kaikai has been selected for a UMass Amherst award by the Provost’s Committee on Service-Learning because of his array of community service activities during his undergraduate career at the university. “I am writing to congratulate you!” said John Reiff, the director of UMass Civic Engagement and Service-Learning. “You were nominated by [Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Professor] Erin Baker for an award, the Academic Engagement for Community Transformation Award, which recognizes your leadership, academic excellence, and contribution to a...

Senior electrical engineering major Kelly Kennedy plays a key role in helping female students at the UMass Amherst College of Engineering stay the course at school, thrive in their educations, and graduate into gainful jobs. She is the president of the UMass Amherst chapter for the Society of Women Engineers (SWE). If you are a female contemplating attending the college, you ought to be aware of what Kelly, SWE, and all its activities can do for you. By joining SWE, you are guaranteed an expanding network of college and professional contacts, a built-in female support system in a male-...

Civil Engineering Major Jessica Boakye has been honored as a 2013-2014 “Rising Researcher” by Research Next, the UMass Amherst publication and website that recognizes the outstanding research, scholarship, and creativity of the students and faculty on campus. Boakye’s work recently won her a spot as one of the “New Faces of Civil Engineering” in the nation by the American Society of Civil Engineers, which annually honors 10 students throughout the United States. The Rising Researcher Award was...

Research Assistant Professor Patrick Ray is part of a team of researchers in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department building a knowledge base about the Brahmaputra River in South Asia that will help scientists and water managers in the region. The project is aimed at alleviating poverty, improving hydroelectric and agricultural potential, and improving the overall lives of more than one billion people living near the river basin. Read related article at SciDev.net »...

On December 11, MIE students in Professor David McLaughlin’s Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering course gathered in a large circle in the Student Union Ballroom, laughing, shouting, and cheering as dozens of their scale-model smart cars darted across the floor in an exercise of vehicle avoidance. The occasion was the class’s annual end-of-the-semester Smart Car Extravaganza. Now in its third year, the demonstration is the culmination of a semester-long assignment to build model cars using Arduino processors, motors, transistors, gears, and various sensors to monitor and control the...

Four enterprising teams of senior engineering majors have been chosen as winners during the end-of-semester Senior Design Competition for MIE 415, the capstone course for the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department. The evaluation process was carried out both by popular vote of the audience and a panel of expert judges. Accordingly, the team calling itself Instrumented Beehive won the Popular Vote. The Best Semester Project went to EZ Pack Paintbrush, and Kinex Cappers was picked as the Best Year-long Project, with Unified Health coming in an “extremely close” second. 

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Melissa Paciulli, a Ph.D. candidate in Transportation Engineering in our Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, recently received the Women in Transportation (WTS) Boston Ann M. Hershfang Graduate Scholarship. She was also nominated for the Helene M. Overly Memorial Scholarship, offered through WTS International. The Hershfang Graduate Scholarship is awarded to a woman currently enrolled in a graduate program within a transportation-related field with plans to pursue a career in the transportation industry. Puciulli is the program manager for the Massachusetts Cooperative...

Five of the 10 finalists in the final round of the Graduate School’s inaugural Three Minute Thesis (3MT) contest are from the College of Engineering. The event, which is free and open to the public, will be held on March 24 from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. in the Student Union Ballroom. See event flyer. 3MT finalists will highlight their research in engaging three-minute presentations, with $1,000 going to the winner, $500 to the runner-up, and $500 to the People’s Choice as voted on by the audience....

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