The University of Massachusetts Amherst
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The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Fluids Engineering Division has presented Professor David Schmidt of the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department and three co-authors with ASME’s prestigious 2018 Lewis F. Moody Award for their paper on "Modeling Sealing in Transient Injector Simulations.” Among other innovations, the award-winning paper described groundbreaking research to create the first simulation of a multiple injection event.

A team of researchers including Assistant Professor Yubing Sun of the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department has demonstrated that human pluripotent stem cells can be guided to become the precursors of the central nervous system and that mechanical signals play a key role in this process. Sun and his colleagues outlined their findings in a recent paper published in the journal Nature Materials. Sun is a co-first author and co-corresponding author of the paper.

See Science & Technology Research News and News Office release.

Associate Professor Chul Park of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department commented quite extensively in a news story written by staff writer Sarah Robertson in the Daily Hampshire Gazette about a potentially harmful algae bloom affecting Lake Metacomet in Belchertown. Park said that such blooms are usually caused by high temperatures and an imbalance of nutrients in the water.

The College welcomes Tammy Haut Donahue, Professor/Department Head, BME; Konstantinos Andreadis, Asst. Professor, CEE;  Seth Donahue, Professor, BME; Govind Srimathveeravalli, Asst.  Professor, MIE; Omar Abdelrahman, Asst. Professor, ChE; Yanfei Xu, Asst. Professor, MIE; Peng Bai, Asst. Professor, ChE; Anuj Pradhan, Asst.  Professor, MIE; Jinglei Ping, Asst. Professor, MIE; and Wen Chen, Asst. Professor, MIE.

Professors Joshua Yang and Qiangfei Xia of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at UMass Amherst led a research team from multiple institutions – including the NASA Ames Research Center, Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, and the Air Force Research Lab – which has realized the first “capacitive neural network” experimentally, a leap forward in the development of a new neuro-biological architecture that can mimic very useful qualities of the human brain and nervous system.

The Computers and Information in Engineering Division (CIE) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) has selected post-doctoral researcher Thomas Hagedorn of the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department as the recipient for this year’s CIE Best Dissertation Award. Hagedorn’s dissertation, directed by MIE Professors Sundar Krishnamurty and Ian Grosse, presents a knowledge-based approach to addressing the existing and emerging challenges of medical device design.

A news story by Brian Murphy in the August 7 Charlotte News & Observer says officials in Charlotte, N.C., are considering installing weather radars designed by the Engineering Research Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA), developed at UMass Amherst and currently employed in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, where they are used to detect tornadoes and other severe weather. The CASA radars have a short range and can see weather events much closer to the ground than conventional weather radars.

Professor Shelly Peyton of the Chemical Engineering Department is the subject of a video in the UMass Amherst Video Profile Series, which offers firsthand accounts “of how UMass Amherst has been a transformative force in the lives of those who study, do research, and teach here.”

Principal Investigator Jae-Hwang Lee of the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst is leading a $500,000 research project to greatly improve an important additive manufacturing process for creating various polymeric coatings and plastic parts while saving energy and refraining from using hazardous compounds. Lee’s project is funded for three years by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Doctoral student Christopher Merola of the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department was the winner out of 171 entries in the 2018 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Antennas and Propagation Society (AP-S) Student Paper competition, taking place on July 10 at the 2018 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and USNC-URSI Radio Science Meeting in Boston. Merola’s paper is titled “A Class of Cavity-Based UWB Multi-Beamformers with Applications to Sub-6 GHz 5G,” and his advisor is ECE Professor Marinos Vouvakis.

See Merola’s poster summarizing his paper »

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