University of Massachusetts Amherst

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University of Massachusetts Amherst chemical engineering major Brendan Walker, a senior honors student from Yarmouth Port, Massachusetts, is doing some critical research on those strange and wonderful quantum dots. These luminescent nanoparticles promise to revolutionize medical diagnostic devices, photovoltaic cells, and many industries from healthcare to home entertainment.

Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Weibo Gong and his doctoral student, Sheng Xiao, have been selected to receive a $25,000 Commercial Ventures and Intellectual Property (CVIP) Technology Development Fund award from the University of Massachusetts president’s office. The name of their project is "Wireless Secret Key Management Using Communication Randomness."

On Wednesday, February 24, Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor David Reckhow was one of four speakers invited to participate in a forum on Cape Cod wastewater treatment and contaminants. Professor Reckhow is one of the country’s leading researchers in this field. The forum was attended by 70 people at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship in East Falmouth and was entitled “Wastewater and Emerging Toxic Contaminants of Concern,” sponsored by Cape Cod & the Islands Group – Sierra Club, the Silent Spring Institute, and the Green Sanctuary Committee.

The name of the sleek vehicle with the teardrop design is Vroom Vroom Carbon Fiber 1, or VV-CF1. It was reportedly named by the four-year-old son of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Professor David Schmidt, faculty advisor for the University of Massachusetts Amherst Supermileage Vehicle Team, which will compete in the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) national supermileage competition in Marshall, Michigan, this June 10 and 11.

On April 14, Dr. Dev Gupta '77 Ph.D., an adjunct professor in the University of Massachusetts Amherst Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, received an Alumni Association 2010 Distinguished Alumni Award, as presented at the Massachusetts State House. Each year the Alumni Association honors alumni, faculty, and friends who have built on their UMass Amherst experience to attain distinguished achievements in the public, business, or service realms. The 2010 Distinguished Alumni Awards were presented in the Great Hall of the Massachusetts State House.

A new paper co-authored by Chemical Engineering Department faculty members David Ford and Dimitrios Maroudas and their jointly advised doctoral student, Ray M. Sehgal, among others, was chosen as a research highlight on the website of the Journal of Chemical Physics. "The Journal of Chemical Physics would like to congratulate you on the success of your manuscript, entitled 'Fokker-Planck Analysis of Separation Dependent Potentials and Diffusion Coefficients in Simulated Microscopy Experiments,' as having been chosen as a research highlight featured on the journal website home page," the journal wrote.

Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has grown very fast during these first eight years. About 40 percent of the veterans returning from the war chose engineering courses. The entering class in the School of Engineering in September of 1947 was 120. In September of 1954, the total number of engineers enrolled was 728.

The engineering quadrangle was filled with sunshine and well-wishers on April 27th, 1991, for the dedication of the college’s new research facility, the Knowles Engineering Building. Speeches and ceremonies praising the facility and the man its name honors, alumnus Andrew C. Knowles III, were given graciously on the steps of the brick building.

Knowles praised the accomplishments of the university and college and told the audience that the dedication was not a time to look back at the past, but a time to look ahead.

By Helen M. Wise

Using a process called microwave remote sensing, two researchers in the UMass Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering are working hard to make forecasting the weather easier.

Their technique could also be used to understand other fast-changing natural phenomena, such as ocean currents and sea-ice, a goal usually frustrated by the very dynamics of the complex meteorological processes involved.

By Arthur J. Snider
Daily News Science Writer

When the first space ship lands on the moon, will it come to a jarring halt on a solid foundation – or will it sink into a sea of dust?

Until recent years, it was generally accepted that the large flat areas of the moon were covered with hardened lava spewed up by volcanoes or transferred by the great heat of meteorite bombardments.

This is no longer agreed upon. There are some scientists who warn that moon dust may run many feet deep.

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