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An article by lead author Daniel Schaubert, the director of the Advanced Sensor and Communications Antennas research center in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, rated third best on the top-ten list of “most read” online articles in the Microwave Journal for 2009. The article – “State-of-the-Art Antenna Technology: The 2008 Antenna Applications Symposium,” written by Schaubert, Jennifer Bernhard, University of Illinois, Robert Mailloux, US Air Force Research Laboratory, and W. Devereux Palmer, US Army Research Office – was the cover story in the January 2009 issue of the journal.

A new scholarship endowment set up by alumnus Robert Hagerty (Industrial Engineering ‘74), the president of the Polycom company of Pleasanton, California, has been set up to support undergraduate students in the College of Engineering who are veterans of Iraq or Afghanistan. The Robert C. Hagerty Scholarship will be awarded annually to students in the college who are veterans of the U.S. military and whose service includes a posting in Iraq or Afghanistan.

Erin Baker of the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department is one of four researchers from the University of Massachusetts Amherst on the "cutting edge" of global warming science who will be interviewed in an upcoming series on the Research Channel. Baker, Julie Brigham-Grette and Raymond Bradley of the Geosciences Department, and Duncan Irschick of the Biology Department will all be featured in the National Science Foundation-sponsored series, "To What Degree? What Science is Telling Us About Climate Change," which airs on the Research Channel from January 7 through January 23.

David Reckhow, a professor in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, was featured prominently December 8 on the Maine Public Broadcasting Network talking about trace elements of pharmaceuticals such as estrogen, which is increasingly found in fresh water ponds near developed areas. The compounds are believed to be the cause of gender changes found in some of New England’s amphibians and frogs.

Neil Forbes of the Chemical Engineering Department was interviewed by local public radio station WFCR on December 11 about the delivery and trigger system he has developed to place TRAIL, a cancer-fighting protein, directly into solid tumors and to activate it on cue. Forbes engineered a non-toxic kind of Salmonella bacteria that can use its own self-propulsion system to venture deep into tumors and manufacture the powerful anti-cancer drug.

What would happen if Leonardo da Vinci, the prototype of the Renaissance person, were alive today? He would probably be a cellular engineer. Cellular engineering is the new frontier in applied biology that integrates research across disciplines such as animal science, biology, chemical engineering, chemistry, microbiology, physics, and polymer science. Within the Institute for Cellular Engineering (ICE) at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, more than 34 faculty members and 40 graduate students from 11 departments and interdisciplinary graduate programs across campus are busy creating a new breed of Leonardo.

When the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst recently introduced an innovative concept in which student volunteers teach their peers about technical subjects near and dear to their hearts, nobody knew for sure what the response would be. It’s remarkable, then, that within days after the seven voluntary courses were announced, 58 participants signed up.

Professor Lixin Gao of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department has just received notice that she will receive the honorary title of Fellow from the IEEE “for contributions to inter-domain internet protocol network routing.” IEEE was originally an acronym for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, but today the organization's scope of interest has expanded into so many related fields that it is simply referred to by the letters I-E-E-E (pronounced Eye-triple-E).

Two new Hluchyj Fellows have been named for the 2009-2010 academic year, and they couldn't present more of a contrast. He (Jack) Ze, an incoming doctoral student in electrical engineering, is from the exotic and historical city of Hangzhou, China, which Marco Polo referred to as "the City of Heaven" during his 13th-century visit there. Meanwhile, doctoral nursing student Shoshana Gladstone comes from the nearby home town of Pelham, Massachusetts, former stomping grounds of Daniel Shay and his anti-establishment rebels in 1786-87.

On Friday, October 2, a group of people involved intimately with the Hluchyj Fellowship program took advantage of the Skinner Hall dedication ceremonies to get together and celebrate the two donors, Dr. Michael Hluchyj ('76 B.S. Electrical Engineering) and Mrs. Theresa Hluchyj (B.S. School of Nursing). The Hluchyjs are supporting annual stipends of $25,000 each for one graduate student in the College of Engineering and one graduate student in the School of Nursing.

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