The University of Massachusetts Amherst
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Like any born engineer, Monique Farrell is a woman with a plan. In fact, she began designing her chemical engineering career as an eighth-grader, when she finished second in a national science competition. In short order, she later excelled at the High School of Commerce in Springfield with maximum honors and did three years of biotech related lab training, experiments, and workshops as part of the Baystate Hospital Education Partnerships after-school program.

Electrical and Computer Engineering Department graduate student Krzysztof Orzel has won The Spiros G. Geotis Prize, awarded for the best student paper and poster at the American Meteorological Society’s 35th Conference on Radar Meteorology, held from September 26 to 30 at the Omni William Penn Hotel in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Orzel’s paper was entitled "Mobile X-band dual-polarization phased-array radar: system requirements and development." Orzel’s advisor is Professor Stephen Frasier of the ECE department.

Over the summer, members of the NSF Engineering Research Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) were hard at work organizing outreach activities to benefit CASA’s students, industrial partners, and the general public. Through these outreach activities, CASA’s students were given opportunities to participate in various events to spread the word about CASA’s revolutionary research into observing, understanding, tracking, and predicting severe weather, while also saving lives.

UMass Amherst has been chosen to lead a consortium of seven universities and host a major new center, the Northeast Climate Science Center (CSC) through a five-year, $7.5 million grant. It will support federal, state and other agencies by studying the effects of climate change on ecosystems, wildlife, water and other resources in the region. Principal investigator of the new CSC at UMass Amherst is Richard Palmer, head of civil and environmental engineering.

When Vietnamese immigrant To Chong talks about the transformation in his life triggered by UMass, it brings to mind the metamorphosis from an earthbound larva in a milky green cocoon into a soaring black and gold monarch butterfly. Some 10 years ago, To arrived in this country as a senior in high school with very little ability to communicate verbally in English.

On September 28, iControl Networks, a leader in broadband home management, announced the appointment of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department alumnus Robert (Bob) Hagerty as the company's new CEO. As CEO, Hagerty will focus on product execution with iControl's existing customer and partner networks, as well as growing the company through new market and partnership opportunities. Hagerty will replace co-CEOs Jim Johnson and Paul Dawes, both of whom will remain with iControl in leadership positions.

Professor Wei-Bo Gong of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department has been asked to be the plenary speaker at the 2012 Chinese Control Conference (CCC) next July in Hefei, the capital city of Anhui Province in China. “Since you are with high international reputation in the field,” wrote Han-Fu Chen, general chairman of the 31st CCC, “we would like to invite you to deliver a plenary talk at CCC'12.” Since 1979, CCC has been staged as an annual international conference, organized by the Technical Committee on Control Theory of the Chinese Association of Automation.

Melissa St. Amand, a doctoral candidate in the University of Delaware’s Department of Chemical Engineering and an undergraduate alumna of the Chemical Engineering Department at UMass Amherst, will present her biotechnology research at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) annual meeting on October 17. St. Amand’s presentation, entitled “Controllability Analysis of Protein Glycosylation in CHO Cells,” assesses the protein glycosylation and its role in improving quality control strategies in the biopharmaceutical industry. St.

Tilman Wolf of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and operations management expert Anna Nagurney of the Isenberg School of Management received a three-year, $909,794, National Science Foundation grant to address some of the difficulties with new protocols and services on the Internet. The project, "Network Innovation through Choice," is part of a $2.7 million collaborative project.

The project also includes the University of Kentucky, North Carolina State University, and the Renaissance Computing Institute of Asheville, North Carolina.

Graduate students Shuang Li of the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department and Jean Cody from the School of Nursing have been named the 2011-2012 Hluchyj Fellows at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The Hluchyj Graduate Fellowship was started by Dr. Michael Hluchyj, a 1979 alumnus of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, and his wife, Theresa “Terry” Hluchyj, a 1977 alumna from the School of Nursing.

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