The University of Massachusetts Amherst
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Stephen Malkin, Distinguished Professor Emeritus in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, received an honorary doctorate degree (doctor honoris causa) from J. E. Purkyně University in the Czech Republic on November 11 in “recognition of his accomplishments in machining and particularly in grinding theory and the application of grinding methods.” Dr. Malkin has been a faculty member at UMass Amherst since 1986 and served as department head from 2000 to 2006.

Professor David Schmidt of the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department was the keynote speaker at the Open Source CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) International 2010 conference, held in Munich, Germany, on November 4 and 5. The title of his talk was “Multi-scale Challenges in Multiphase CFD [Computational Fluid Dynamics].” As Dr. Schmidt explains, “The talk compared three methods used in my research group for simulating multiphase flow.

Prabhjeet Raj Singh, the vice president of the Infinity Engineering Group, Ltd., of North Vancouver, British Columbia, was honored on October 16 with a College of Engineering 2010 Outstanding Junior Alumni Award for “serving as a worthy ambassador for the college and demonstrating extraordinary effort and notable success in his early career.” Singh was co-leader of design teams working on both the Deh Cho Bridge in the Northwest Territories (still under construction) and the Golden Ears Bridge (Segment 3 land structures) in south central British Columbia, among others.

This article is the second in a series showcasing the accomplished graduates recently presented with Outstanding Senior and Junior Alumni Awards. Fairfax Station, Virginia, resident David C. Jeanes, the retired president of the Steel Market Development Institute,was honored on October 16 at the University of Massachusetts Amherst with a College of Engineering 2010 Outstanding Senior Alumni Award for having brought recognition and honor to the college through his professional achievements, leadership, and service to his profession, university, and society.

This article is the first in a series showcasing the accomplished graduates recently presented with Outstanding Senior and Junior Alumni Awards. Waltham resident Alaina B. Hanlon, the President and CEO of PhenotypeIT, Inc. of Newton, was honored on October 16 with a College of Engineering 2010 Outstanding Junior Alumni Award for “serving as a worthy ambassador for the college and demonstrating extraordinary effort and notable success in her early career.”

Imagine being blindfolded and then turned loose, on your own, to navigate a large, strange building that you’ve never entered before. It would be like one of those sadistic, mean-spirited reality TV shows. Yet that’s precisely the predicament encountered by many of the 161 million people worldwide who suffer from vision impairment. Now an electronic system called PERCEPT, being developed by Professor Aura Ganz of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, will allow visually impaired individuals, each equipped only with a three-ounce electronic device and Bluetooth headphone, to navigate unfamiliar buildings with ease.

A robotic fish, built by Dr. Yahya Modarres-Sadeghi of our Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, was featured in the New Scientist, inspired by an article in the journal Bioinspiration & Biomimetics and entitled "A fast-starting mechanical fish that accelerates at 40 m s−2." "We have built a simple mechanical system to emulate the fast-start performance of fish," as the Bioinspiration & Biomimetics article explained. "The system consists of a thin metal beam covered by a urethane rubber, the fish body, and an appropriately shaped tail."

Associate Professor Neil Forbes of the Chemical Engineering Department has published a review entitled “Engineering the perfect (bacterial) cancer therapy” in the November 2010 (Vol 10 No 11) edition of the prestigious publication, Nature Reviews (Cancer). As Dr. Forbes summarizes such a “perfect therapy” in his article: “It would be tiny programmable 'robot factories' that specifically target tumors, are selectively cytotoxic to cancer cells, are self-propelled, are responsive to external signals, can sense the local environment, and are externally detectable.”

On November 5, a shoebox-sized vehicle with the intriguing name of “Green Rock Eating Monster” will try to take Salt Lake City by storm with a hail of hydrogen electrons. The little vehicle, which runs on clean green hydrogen, is the University of Massachusetts Amherst entry in the national Chem-E-Car Competition, sponsored by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) at its Annual Student Conference in Salt Lake City.

In October, employees from the Raytheon Company met with 17 College of Engineering female and minority students to give them a first-hand crash course in the culture of industry and the value of diversity in the corporate setting. James Chang, a member of the Raytheon Asian Pacific Association, George Bamfo, who is from the Raytheon Black Employee Network, and Mary Ellen O’Donnell, vice-president of the Raytheon Women’s Network, gave our students their insiders’ perspective on their Raytheon experience and offered our students their leadership and mentoring advice.

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