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NEPR Covers Research of ECE Doctoral Student Chris Merola on More Efficient Cell Towers for Cellular Networks

Christopher Merola

Christopher Merola

In early October Lindsey McGinnis of New England Public Radio reported on the pioneering research of Electrical and Computer Engineering doctoral student Chris Merola, who is trying to create much more efficient cell towers to service the sonic boom in cellular networks. “Americans' wireless data consumption has skyrocketed since 4G technology was introduced nearly a decade ago,” wrote McGinnis. “Smartphones have become essential for on-the-go work and entertainment, fueling the need for 5G. But how do you create a cellular network that accommodates everything from streaming services to self-driving cars?”

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The Key to Your Mind-expanding Study Abroad Adventure of a Lifetime Is to Start Planning Right Now!

Map of Australia with pins stuck in it

Think about this: the College of Engineering Study Abroad Program offers students the chance to enhance their education, meet colleagues from many foreign countries, make international connections, learn about foreign societies, visit natural and cultural wonders, broaden their minds, taste enticing new cuisines, become citizens of the world, and view life with a panoramic new vision. What could be better? But the key is to start planning right now!

Go to College of Engineering Study Abroad website »

UMass Engineers Made Crossbar Arrays of the Smallest Memristors

Qiangfei Xia

Qiangfei Xia

A research team led by Qiangfei Xia of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has just published a paper in the prestigious journal Nature Nanotechnology about research into a promising building block for the next generation of nonvolatile random access memory and bio-inspired computing systems. The research team says that its working memristor crossbar arrays are “to the best of our knowledge, the first high-density electronic circuits with individually addressable components scaled down to two-nanometer dimension built with foundry-compatible fabrication technologies.”

NSF Research Attracts Coverage from Psychology Today

Guangyu Xu

Guangyu Xu

Guangyu Xu of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department is part of a team of scientists based at UMass Amherst that has been awarded a four-year, $953,300 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop miniature, implantable hardware, which can record complex brain activity in animals and analyze it in real time. See News Office release. The NSF funding is part of $16 million given to 18 cross-disciplinary projects around the country to conduct innovative research on neural and cognitive systems, thus attracting key coverage by the venerable Psychology Today.

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