University of Massachusetts Amherst

Search Google Appliance

Links

Research Highlights

Professors Qiangfei Xia and J. Joshua Yang of our Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department led a team of scientists who have developed a groundbreaking new type of hardware security device enabled by memristors, or resistive switching devices, as described in an article in the prestigious scientific journal Nature Communications. The title of the new article is “A Novel True Random Number Generator Based on a Stochastic Diffusive Memristor.” This work paves the way for memristors in...

The UMass Transportation Center (UMTC), responsible for promoting transportation research, education, and training throughout the Commonwealth, is pleased to announce the opening of a new office location in the UMass Center at Springfield. The UMass Center, located in downtown Springfield, is a partnership between the University of Massachusetts and other area institutes of higher public education. The new office, which officially opened on September 1, provides a central location accessible to students at each school.

“The high-level of transportation and economic development...

The research of Zlatan Aksamija, an Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UMass Amherst, and his grad student Adithya Kommini was highlighted in the September 19 “news” section of the Massachusetts Green High Performance Computing Center (MGHPCC) website. The two researchers use computers at the MGHPCC to carry out nanomolecular materials modeling experiments exploring the thermoelectric behavior of materials for use in energy applications. See entire article

As the MGHPCC article, written by...

AMHERST, Mass. – Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst College of Engineering are developing a multi-purpose radar system that can detect very small drone aircraft and also serve as a severe weather warning system for airports and urban settings. The system is designed to scan the airspace closest to the ground where drones and severe weather are not currently visible to existing weather radar and aircraft surveillance systems. The project is funded with an 18-month, $200,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.

Michael Zink, associate professor of...

The number of persons newly infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the U.S. is about 50,000 each year and has not decreased since the late 1990s. To address this critical problem, the first National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) was developed in 2010, with a goal to reduce incidence by 25 percent by 2015; but, since that goal was never met, it was delayed until 2020. Now Professor Chaitra Gopalappa of our Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (MIE) Department is receiving a grant of $1,567,348 from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to answer several critical questions...

Chemically and thermally robust fiber mats, capable of carrying “cargo” such as small molecule compounds, hold tremendous potential for applications in which green materials are imperative, such as wound healing, water remediation, catalysis, and food packaging. The catch is that the manufacturing process for such mats traditionally depends on toxic solvents and/or cytotoxic crosslinking agents. In order to produce environmentally friendly fiber mats, Professors Jessica Schiffman and Sarah Perry of our Chemical Engineering Department have received a three-year, $338,180 grant from the...

Neural tube defects are among the most common birth defects and affect more than 500,000 infants worldwide each year, resulting in severe health problems, including paralysis of legs, brain damage, and even death. Now Professor Yubing Sun of our Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department has received a $400,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to develop a series of engineered tools to enable the investigation of the poorly understood mechanism that causes neural tube defects.

...

Professor Qiangfei Xia of the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst leads a multi-institutional group of researchers who have invented a new kind of memristor entirely based on silicon materials, which could act as a promising building block for the next generation of memory and neuromorphic computing systems. “The current work opens up opportunities for low-cost mass production of 3D memristor arrays on large silicon and flexible substrates without increasing circuit complexity,” as the research team summarizes its research....

Pages