The University of Massachusetts Amherst
University of Massachusetts Amherst

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Research Highlights

Byung H. Kim, a professor of mechanical and industrial engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, is using a three-year, $272,719 grant from the National Science Foundation to develop a manufacturing process that imprints nano- and micro-scale features into a roll of continuously extruded material. Kim received the grant along with his research partner Donggang Yao, a professor at Georgia Tech and former UMass Amherst graduate student whom Kim supervised for master’s and doctoral degrees.

Researchers at the College of Engineering, led by principal investigator Yahya Modarres-Sadeghi of the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department (MIE), together with their collaborator at Northeastern University have received a $440,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to conduct intensive research on controlling wind turbine blade instabilities.

The UMass Amherst News Office reports that a team of engineers and computer scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has received a three-year, $486,524 grant from the National Science Foundation for a project to enhance privacy in smart buildings and homes. The project is under the direction of David Irwin of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and Prashant Shenoy of the College of Information and Computer Sciences.

Ph.D. student John Logan of the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department won the “Best Student Paper” Award at the 39th Allerton Symposium on Antenna Applications, held from September 22 to 24 in Monticello, Illinois. Logan’s faculty advisor is ECE Professor Marinos Vouvakis, and the title of his winning paper was “Low Cross-Polarization Single-Polarized Vivaldi Arrays.”

Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst College of Engineering have designed an invention that would make it feasible, practical, and economical to install life-saving seat belts on some 30,000 motor coaches nationwide that venture on the road without seat belts.

A feature story in the Daily Hampshire Gazette recently focused on the work of Shelly Peyton, chemical engineering, and her work developing chemotherapy drugs by studying how cancer cells respond to drugs in an environment that mimics human tissue. Peyton and her team of researchers create artificial tissues that realistically mimic various human organs, then test how cancer cells placed in these tissues respond to chemotherapy drugs.

Two researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst are aiming to create better fitting, more functional, and comfortable robotic lower limbs for amputees, especially those over 65. Principal investigator Frank Sup of the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department and Brian Umberger of the Kinesiology Department have received a $630,331 grant over three years from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop these revolutionary robotic prostheses for below-knee amputees.

Professor Zlatan Aksamija of our Electrical and Computer Engineering Department is a co-principal investigator for a multi-disciplinary team of researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), MIT, and UMass Amherst that has received a National Science Foundation (NSF) $1,999,966 grant to study the heterostructures of 2D materials and their thermal properties.

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