The University of Massachusetts Amherst
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Guangyu Xu of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department is part of a team of scientists based at UMass Amherst that has been awarded a four-year, $953,300 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop miniature, implantable hardware, which can record complex brain activity in animals and analyze it in real time. See News Office release. The NSF funding is part of $16 million given to 18 cross-disciplinary projects around the country to conduct innovative research on neural and cognitive systems, thus attracting key coverage by the venerable Psychology Today.

In an article posted on October 16, the UMass News Office reports on the fifth department established by the College of Engineering, the Biomedical Engineering Department. Professor Tammy L. Haut Donahue, the founding department head, will lead the emerging program, which will offer bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees. The college will eventually hire 12 full-time, tenure-track faculty members for the department by the fall of 2022.

“Is there a difference between a rotary and a roundabout?” Boston Globe correspondent Morgan Hughes asked a very New-England-centric question in a recent edition of the Globe. “Transportation experts at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have the answer.” Yes, the UMass Transportation Center has launched a series of informational videos that explore a range of issues often questioned by the driving public. The series is made up of short, five- to 10-minute videos released monthly and hosted by staff from the center.

Emily Kumpel of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department is sponsoring an interdisciplinary senior design project for five Mechanical Engineering students to design a “DIY Portable Incubator for Testing Microbial Water Quality in Field Settings.”  In rural areas of underdeveloped countries the portable incubators currently on the market for this application are unavailable, expensive, or require reliable electricity....

On Friday, November 2, the College of Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst will hold its ninth annual Outstanding Alumni Awards Celebration (Registration & More info ») during Homecoming Weekend. The college’s celebration will be held in the Marriott Room on the 11th floor of the Campus Center at UMass Amherst. The Homecoming Reception & Awards Celebration will begin at 4:30 p.m. During the reception, the College of Engineering will present its Outstanding Senior and Junior Alumni Awards to eight individuals who, through exemplary accomplishments, epitomize the potential of a superlative education at the UMass Amherst College of Engineering.

Go to alumni awards website »

Inside UMass reports that two scientists at UMass Amherst, including Professor Sarah Perry of the Chemical Engineering Department, are building a new class of environmentally friendly polymer materials made from complex coacervates that contain solid nanoparticles. The scientists hope their research into these new complex coacervates will have a radical impact on applications ranging from polymer coatings to vaccine formulation.

See Inside UMass article: Scientists Make Polymers Containing Solid Nanoparticles.

Professor David McLaughlin of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department is a co-principal investigator on a five-year, $3-million ADVANCE Institutional Transformation Grant awarded to UMass Amherst from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The huge award will support the development of an innovative professional advancement model for underrepresented faculty in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). According to the NSF, the ADVANCE program seeks to develop systemic approaches to increase the participation and advancement of women in academic STEM careers.

A new paper by a research team led by Qiangfei Xia, Daniel Holcomb, and Joshua Yang of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst describes a pioneering new technique to support the safe use of all-important “digital keys” in protecting hardware security systems and producing more secure, compact, and efficient memristive hardware. The paper, titled "A provable key destruction scheme based on memristive crossbar arrays," has just been published in the prestigious peer-reviewed journal Nature Electronics.

In late October, College of Engineering Dean Tim Anderson will visit Ames, Iowa, to receive the 2018 Marston Medal presented by the Iowa State University College of Engineering. The Marston Medal recognizes alumni of the Iowa State College of Engineering for outstanding achievement in advancing engineering science, technology, or policy having national and international impact in academics, industry, public service, government, or other venues.

In late August Professor Ian Grosse of the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department received the Distinguished Service Award from the Computers and Information in Engineering (CIE) Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). Grosse earned the award “in recognition and appreciation of leadership and outstanding service to the ASME Computers and Information in Engineering Division.” Grosse was elected an ASME Fellow in 2012.

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