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Shirley and Ting-Wei Tang Endowment Lecture Series

 

2022 Shirley and Ting-Wei Tang Lecture


Joseph HidlerFrom Concept to Market: Bringing a Medical Device to Life

Joseph Hidler '94
Aretech, LLC

 

 

Thursday, October 13, 2022
4:00pm, Old Chapel
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Free and open to the public

 

Register here >>


 

Abstract

Back in 2004, an idea for a medical device was born.  The concept was simple: Develop a system that would provide patients who had experienced a stroke, traumatic brain injury or other neurological disorders the opportunity to practice walking safely and effectively.  The execution of this ‘simple’ concept turned out to be anything but simple.  This seminar will take you on a journey of the birth and evolution of a medical device that is now being used by thousands of patients across the world.  Discussions on the engineering challenges, the economic considerations, regulatory requirements, and business pitfalls will all be presented.  A roadmap for aspiring medical device entrepreneurs will be outlined with the hope that those who also have ‘simple’ concepts will be successful. 

 

Speaker Bio

Joseph Hidler received a BS degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 1994, and his MS and PhD degrees in biomedical engineering from Northwestern University in 1996 and 2001, respectively.  From 2001 – 2009, he was an associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Catholic University and the director of the Center for Applied Biomechanics and Rehabilitation Research (CABRR) at the National Rehabilitation Hospital.  Dr. Hidler is currently the owner and CEO of Aretech, LLC, a medical device company in Ashburn, Virginia.

 


 

Past Lectures »

 

The Shirley and Ting-Wei Tang Endowment Lecture Series, founded in 1999, brings leaders of both engineering education and engineering-based companies to campus to present a major talk to the University.  Lectures cover subjects such as technology innovation, entrepreneurship, engineering education, global engineering issues, and engineering and business leadership. 

Lecturers are invited to interact with students and faculty before and after the lecture. “This is a chance for students to develop a relationship on a human level with an accomplished business leader or educator,” said Joseph I. Goldstein, dean of engineering in 1999. “I see the field of business having more to say to engineering, and our students need to be aware of what’s going on beyond their field. Many of our students will eventually be leaders in these technology-based businesses.”

Shirley Tang was an academic adviser for the United Asia Learning Resource Center before retiring from UMass Amherst in 1998. Ting-wei Tang taught in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering for more than 30 years and is a professor emeritus. “We decided to establish an endowment in the College of Engineering because we want to make UMass better,” the Tangs said.